• Women's History Month

    Celebrate International Women’s Day!

    March 8th marks International Women’s Day, a day where people of all backgrounds, cultures, and races can come together and celebrate the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. Here’s a quick history of how this day got started. In 1908, fifteen thousand women marched through New York City, protesting unequal pay and demanding voting rights. In August 1910, one hundred delegates from over seventeen countries met in Copenhagen at the International Conference of Working Women. There, Clara Zetkin proposed a day each year where women all over the world would simultaneously press for their demands. A year later on March 19th, more than one million people from across…

  • LOHFReadalong,  Reading Recommendations,  Women's History Month

    National Read Across America Day

    The National Education Association established National Read Across America Day in 1998 with a main aim of encouraging children to read. If you love to read and spend a lot of time with books, you may not always consider what a privilege it is to be able to read. But due to a variety of reasons, this isn’t the case for all people. Though 1 in 5 American adults are literate, 52% read at or under a basic level. That means that most of Americans read at under a ninth grade reading level. To put that into perspective, most legally binding contracts are written at or above an eleventh grade…

  • Reading Recommendations,  Women's History Month

    Women’s History Month—Celebrating Women in Horror

    March is Women’s History Month, a celebration of women’s contributions throughout history. It began as Women’s History Week, as instituted by Congress in March of 1981 and then expanded over the next five years to encompass the whole month. At LOHF of course, we celebrate women every day! However, this month we wanted to highlight the women who paved the way for modern horror and other speculative genres. During the twelfth century we meet our first lady of horror fiction, Marie de France. Marie was a poet who wrote the poem “Bisclavert” (“The Werewolf”), which was a story of an adulterer who was punished by being trapped in his werewolf form.…

  • LOHF Team Feature

    Library Lovers Day!!

    It is library lovers day!!! This is a day to honor libraries, librarians and all things library! Libraries are an integral part of many of our communities. Librarians are no longer only people that stamp the card on the inside of a book. They are so much more! For example, my library offers the following services: Free breakfast (which is offered every day)—not every child where I live gets breakfast. Job help (job searching and resume help) Knit and crochet club Computer application classes Reading help Math Mondays Spanish class English class Toddler storytime Baby storytime Playtime Jewelry making classes and clubs Block parties As you can see libraries are…

  • Reading Recommendations

    The 10 Books that Have Influenced Me – Toni’s Edition

    Picking ten books that have influenced me is really difficult. I have sat here for an hour looking at my bookshelf. So I am going to be a rebel and talk about 13 books that have influenced me. This list is in no particular order. Each and every one of these books have influenced me or affected me in some way over the last few years. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë – The first time I read this book I was a young angsty goth. The idea of a love that does not die but stretches into eternity just thrilled me to no end. However, this is a good lesson…

  • Guest Post,  New Release

    Into the Forest and All the Way Through……by Cynthia Pelayo

    Here at the LOHF we don’t tend to write blog posts about book releases. However, when Cina contacted me about a poetry collection that she had been working on I jumped on it. Over the last couple of years I have been reading about a plague which has been sweeping across the United States. This is the plague of disappearances and violence against women of color and marginalized communities that is under reported and under represented in the media. Cynthia (Cina) Pelayo was so deeply effected she wrote a collection of true crime poetry that explores the cases of over one hundred missing and murdered women in the United States.…

  • Uncategorized

    The LOHF Congratulates the Shirley Jackson Award Winners

    The Shirley Jackson awards highlight the years outstanding achievement in the genres of psychological suspense, horror and dark fiction. The nominees are judged by authors, editors, critics and academics. Novel: The Book of X by Sarah Rose Etter The Book of X tells the tale of Cassie, a girl born with her stomach twisted in the shape of a knot. From childhood with her parents on the family meat farm, to a desk job in the city, to finally experiencing love, she grapples with her body, men, and society, all the while imagining a softer world than the one she is in. Sarah Rose Etter Sarah Rose Etter is the author…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Women in Horror Month
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Women in Horror by Annie Neugebauer

    I’ve written for Women in Horror Month more times than I can keep track of anymore, and I’ve still scarcely scratched the surface. How could I, when women are such an expansive group—when horror is such a wide-ranging genre? I talk about feminism, history, and contemporary badasses I adore. I talk about books and movies and shows worth seeking out. I talk about my own experiences being both lifted up and quietly pushed to the side. How, then, have I never actually talked about women in horror as its own titular topic? Seems simple enough. So, what do I have to say about women in horror? I mined the depths…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Black History Month
    Guest Post

    Black History Month Guest Post: We Can be Better, Horror Peeps by R.J. Joseph

    I once attended World Horror Convention and a seasoned, white, male horror writer decided to convince me I should join the Horror Writers Association. That was cool. I appreciated that he felt HWA was a good organization to be a part of and I did want more information. The way he decided I should get this information was, “[I had] to meet Chelsea. She’s a great gal.” Of course, my blackity black, female senses started tingling. Gal? Okay. When he finally found “Chelsea” and me in the same place, he introduced us. “Chelsea” was, of course, another Black woman. And her name wasn’t even Chelsea. After she rolled her eyes in the…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Black History Month
    Guest Post

    Black History Month Guest Post:Dear Horror, Do you Love Me? Check Yes or No. by Jessica Guess.

    February is a bit of a chameleon of a month. It is a month of love, a celebration of women in horror and Black History Month. I am so pleased to have a guest post by Jessica Guess. If you identify as a woman and love horror, then February is your time to shine. As a black woman who loves horror, this month is especially significant because February has the distinguished honor of being both Black History Month and Women in Horror Month. Though this may seem like Christmas for black girl horror junkies like me, for a long time it was only a reminder that though I loved horror,…