• Guest Post,  Interviews,  Reading Recommendations

    Shelf Edition: Author Sarah Read

    Our December guest for Shelf Edition is one of our favorite Ladies of Horror Fiction authors, Sarah Read! Sarah is an author and librarian. Do you have any recent favorite LOHF books?  So many! Of course The Rust Maidens by Gwendolyn Kiste, because of course. Sara Tantlinger’s The Devil’s Dreamland and To Be Devoured were both incredible. Julie C Day’s The Rampant was also gorgeously dark. Alma Katsu’s The Hunger ticked all my horror and history-loving boxes. Danielle Kaheaku’s In Extremis was beautiful and full of dread. And Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage was one of my favorite reads last year. What LOHF books do you have on your TBR?…

  • Guest Post,  Reading Recommendations

    Shelf Edition: Sam

    This month, our guest for Shelf Edition is Sam from The Literary Hooker! Sam is a bookstagrammer, blogger and reviewer for Sci-Fi & Scary. She also co-mods the Grim Readers Book Club on Goodreads. When she’s not reading, she’s probably cross stitching and/or watching trashy TV. Do you have any recent favorite LOHF books?  Two that I’ve read this year and absolutely loved were To Be Devoured by Sara Tantlinger and Soon by Lois Murphy. Both books packed an enormous emotional punch for me but were still intensely disturbing and scary. I love horror that can make me cry and then have me jumping out of my skin within a…

  • Guest Post
    Guest Post

    Guest Post:Zombie Bait & Screaming Bimbos: Diversity in Horror By Ann Dávila Cardinal

    Zombie Bait & Screaming Bimbos: Diversity in Horror by Ann Dávila Cardinal Sadly, the concept of diversity in horror is more of a fantasy than a reality. Don’t get me wrong, we have made SO much progress in the last few years. Leaps and bounds, but when I looked back at the continuum of horror literature and films over my fifty-six years of being a fan, I realize just how limited the scope was. From the start horror has been a male-dominated field. Yes, you can point to Mary Shelley, Anne Rice, and Kathryn Bigelow, but the VAST majority of work has been published and produced by men. Specifically, young…

  • Guest Post

    Blog Tour: The Dead Girls Club: The Power of Women Writing Horror by Damien Angelica Walters

    At the LOHF we are all about promoting women horror authors. When we were offered a blog tour space for The Dead Girls Club we felt extremely honored. As part of the blog tour Damien wrote an amazing guest post about women horror authors and we are so here for it. The Power of Women Writing Horror By Damien Angelica Walters The default is male. Always. From crash test dummies to superheroes to medical research subjects, half the population is regularly shunted to the back burner. Boys grow up seeing themselves on movie screens, on television, in the pages of books. They’re heroes, chosen ones, valiant knights, and warriors. They…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
    Guest Post

    LOHF Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month: Chicana Horror by V. Castro

    Chicana Horror By V. Castro When I sit down to write, my first instinct is to scoop out my heart and guts for everyone to see because I want people to know I bleed red even though my skin might be brown. You might scoff and say you already know this; however, my blood is also tainted. It is the product of cultures colliding in massacre and heart break. My heart is tainted because some of my experiences in life are tied to the color of my skin and gender, I’m a Latina, and unless you have experienced this, you will never know.  When I sit down to write I…

  • Guest Post,  Reading Recommendations

    Shelf Edition: Jess

    This month, our guest for Shelf Edition is Jess, who is @ghoulishspirit on social media. Here’s some info from her: Hi, I’m Jess, a 35-year-old stay at home mom with 3 kids, 2 girls and a baby boy (14, 9, and 16 months). I am successfully turning my little ones into mini bookworms as well. I’m an avid horror lover, coffee junkie, movie buff, music enthusiast, and animal lover who likes to style and decorate her dwellings like the Addams family abode. But don’t be fooled because I love color, glitter, and sparkles EVERYWHERE!!!! Do you have any recent favorite LOHF books?  I recently discovered horror poetry while reviewing some…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Witches
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Derivation of Hag by Kathleen Kaufman

    Derivation of Hag By Kathleen Kaufman At San Diego Comic Con, the awesome Brendan Reichs joked that “I wrote a book about my mom and named it Hag.”    He wasn’t wrong, the reaction to the title has sparked immediate and sometimes negative reactions.  We think of Hag as an insult, an ugly old woman, an unwanted creature, witch with a wart on the end of her nose.   It’s all around not something you want to be called.    Or is it?  The derivation of Hag goes back and back.   It is one of very few words that have no masculine form, it is a distinctly female term, used all the way back in the thirteenth…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Witches
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: W is for Witching: An Analysis of the Hawthorne Name and Identity by Stephanie M. Wytovich

    W is for Witching: An Analysis of the Hawthorne Name and Identity  By Stephanie M. Wytovich The Salem Witch Trails took place in February of 1692 and lasted until May of 1693. This bout of hysteria began in a small colony in Massachusetts due to the accusations of Elizabeth Paris, Ann Putnam and Abigail Williams, all of who started having fits and unexplainable episodes that evoked suspicion of the supernatural. Eventually, these girls informed two judges—Johnathan Corwin and John Hathorne—that their illnesses were caused by the afflictions of three women: Tituba (a slave), Sarah Osborne (an elderly woman), and Sarah Good (a beggar). Now most of us know the escalation…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Body Horror
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Busting a Gut: Body Horror, Humor, and the Meaning of Life by Amy Vaughn

    Bodies are a horror show.* Slice open our bumpy, hairy surfaces, and bright reds, deep purples, and fatty yellows spill out. Inside, we are weird and squishy and complicated, and oh-so-much more fragile than we wish we were.  We are our bodies. No shit, huh? But give me a second here. There are at least three different ways this statement is true, and each of them will provoke a fear response if threatened.  First, and most straightforwardly, we are our bodies in the corporeal sense: without them we die. Second, we depend on our bodies for our identity, for who we think we are and for how we present ourselves…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Body Horror
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Why Body Horror, or, Why Do We Entertain Ourselves with Grotesque Mutations, Demonic Gestation, Parasitic Infections, and Ghastly Mutilations By Christa Carmen

    The type of horror that can be described as ‘body horror’ is astronomical in scope. A quick google search tells you that horror novels as disparate as Frankenstein and Coraline are considered body horror by one website or another, and when you take a few moments to really think about it, most subcategories within the overarching genre could be loosely classified as body horror. The following is a list of why we—horror fans and regular humans alike, because let’s face it, even alleged horror haters have ogled a gnarly rash on their own, formerly pristine skin or stared in morbid fascination at the growing sphere of their or their partner’s baby bump—love body…