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    Guest Post: Dysfunctional Families in Horror Fiction by Nico Bell

    We’re thrilled to have Nico Bell join us today to share her picks featuring dysfunctional families in horror fiction! The holiday season is around the corner, and that means families will be gathering to celebrate and reconnect. For some, this is a joyous occasion, met with anticipation and delight. For others, this is a time filled with dread, anxiety, and a whole lot of Zantax. But before you write off your family as dysfunctional, take a look at these twisted relationships, and remember—it could always be worse. Baby Teeth by Zoje Stage If you haven’t read Baby Teeth, now is the time! For fans of We Need to Talk About…

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    Guest Post: The Authors to Blame if You Find Yourself Having Sex in a Cemetery by Jennifer Anne Gordon

    Now, I think it’s safe to say that there are many types of people in the world, today I am going to be writing about one very specific type of person. The “Taphophile”, a word that stems from the Greek, meaning “to love graves”. PLEASE do not get this confused with “Necrophile” (being attracted to dead things) …these are two different types of fetishes. Now, I guess my love affair with cemeteries started when I was young, you see, if I snuck out my back yard and walked just a few hundred blocks though my neighbor’s yard and past her very boisterous and barking Golden Retriever, Sandy, I was transported…

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    Guest Post: The Art of Business for Women Writers by Mary SanGiovanni

    When I was a little girl, I told myself stories.  I hand-wrote pages of scenes between characters, and when I learned to type, I wrote my first story – a mystery about a crime-solving cat modelled after Humphrey Bogart.  I was a voracious reader of speculative fiction.   It wasn’t until high school that it finally clicked with me that the books I read were written by people who did that for a living.  When the understanding fully set in, I knew I wanted to be a fiction writer when I grew up.  I was lucky; my family, teachers, and friends were supportive and encouraging, and I wanted to be…

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    Guest Post: How do you fight a vampire in Australia? by Madeleine D’este

    Old folklore, Hollywood clichés and Antipodean twists After more than 120 years of Stoker’s Dracula, perhaps it’s time to revisit and reinvent the vampire, by mixing the old ways with the new.  When I was first struck by the idea to write about vampires for my new novella Bloodwood, I knew I didn’t want to write Hollywood-style vampires. I wanted to bring the old European vampires back, but with a twist. As a folklore nerd, I knew that the old tales about vampires were very different to Stoker’s Count. The stories from Russia and Eastern Europe tell of unrepentant sinners with skin ruddy with blood returning to haunt their families.…

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    Guest Post: Creativity, Agoraphobia and Isolation by Jennifer Anne Gordon

    At the height of the most powerful creative work of her life, Shirley Jackson suffered from intense agoraphobia. There were months that she was unable to leave her home. Her isolation, and at times deep mental instability led her to create work that inspire me and legions of other horror lovers, now. If there were no Haunting of Hill House, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, then books like Beautiful, Frightening, and Silent and From Daylight to Madness (my Literary Gothic Horror novels) would not exist. I would have a voice that I would perhaps still be afraid to use. In my past, I too have also suffered…

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    Guest Post: How To Survive A Horror Movie

    We have a special guest post today from horror reviewer Ellen Avigliano! You may have seen Ellen around Twitter and Instagram promoting horror for Dead Head Reviews and spreading joy, Supernatural gifs and book love like nobody’s business! Take it away, Ellen. The Unbreakable Power and Unity of Sisterhood We don’t have much time. All eyes are on me. THUNK, THUNK, THUNK. His footfalls are heavy against the tiled floor. Standard issue military combat boots, clomping along in a muted bass tone, echoing and bouncing through the narrow corridor. Between the steel-toed structure of his footwear and immense physical stature, there was no way he was going to tread quietly,…

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    Guest Post,  YA and MG Horror

    Guest Post: Countess Bathory the Early Years by Lana Popovic

    When I started writing YA speculative fiction, my one rule for myself was to stay firmly rooted in the present. While I’ve always enjoyed historical fantasy to the hilt—Mists of Avalon and Jacqueline Carey’s Renaissance-inspired Kushiel’s Legacy series both hold uncontested places in my heart, and I’m still totally ready to swoon over rereads of Outlander—contemporary fantasy just seemed to offer up that sweet spot for my own writing. A modern world, blessedly without the need for too much research, but with a liminal sense of existing within the seams between the mundane and the magical? Pretty much perfect. I’ll play in that sandbox all day, I thought, and never…

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    Guest Post: Haunted Women, Haunted Houses by Jo Kaplan

    The first haunted house story that truly unsettled me was Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper.” It’s also the story I keep coming back to, again and again, to better understand haunted house stories as a peculiarly feminine type of horror. I’m sure you know the story: a young mother being treated for hysteria is confined to a hideous old nursery with hypnotic yellow wallpaper, and as her mind unravels she begins to see a woman lurking behind that wallpaper. The duality between freedom and confinement, between monstrousness and the expectation of passivity, between madness and trauma—there’s so much to unravel in this story which makes it the perfect example…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Women in Horror Month
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    Guest Post: Drinking From the Devil’s Cup by V. Castro

    Tables come in all shapes and sizes, but every table has finite places. What are you supposed to do when that table is occupied, and no one wants to give up their seat? Do you sit on the floor and hope to hear from a distance what is being said?  Do you try to interject as loud as your voice will carry despite gazing at a row of backs? Maybe someone in a seat will hear what you have to say.  Do you try to wedge yourself between two seats, hoping there is enough space for your body before the ones seated become too uncomfortable with your proximity as you stand…

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    Guest Post:Zombie Bait & Screaming Bimbos: Diversity in Horror By Ann Dávila Cardinal

    Zombie Bait & Screaming Bimbos: Diversity in Horror by Ann Dávila Cardinal Sadly, the concept of diversity in horror is more of a fantasy than a reality. Don’t get me wrong, we have made SO much progress in the last few years. Leaps and bounds, but when I looked back at the continuum of horror literature and films over my fifty-six years of being a fan, I realize just how limited the scope was. From the start horror has been a male-dominated field. Yes, you can point to Mary Shelley, Anne Rice, and Kathryn Bigelow, but the VAST majority of work has been published and produced by men. Specifically, young…