• Guest Post

    Blog Tour: The Dead Girls Club: The Power of Women Writing Horror by Damien Angelica Walters

    At the LOHF we are all about promoting women horror authors. When we were offered a blog tour space for The Dead Girls Club we felt extremely honored. As part of the blog tour Damien wrote an amazing guest post about women horror authors and we are so here for it. The Power of Women Writing Horror By Damien Angelica Walters The default is male. Always. From crash test dummies to superheroes to medical research subjects, half the population is regularly shunted to the back burner. Boys grow up seeing themselves on movie screens, on television, in the pages of books. They’re heroes, chosen ones, valiant knights, and warriors. They…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month
    Guest Post

    LOHF Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month: Chicana Horror by V. Castro

    Chicana Horror By V. Castro When I sit down to write, my first instinct is to scoop out my heart and guts for everyone to see because I want people to know I bleed red even though my skin might be brown. You might scoff and say you already know this; however, my blood is also tainted. It is the product of cultures colliding in massacre and heart break. My heart is tainted because some of my experiences in life are tied to the color of my skin and gender, I’m a Latina, and unless you have experienced this, you will never know.  When I sit down to write I…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Witches
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Derivation of Hag by Kathleen Kaufman

    Derivation of Hag By Kathleen Kaufman At San Diego Comic Con, the awesome Brendan Reichs joked that “I wrote a book about my mom and named it Hag.”    He wasn’t wrong, the reaction to the title has sparked immediate and sometimes negative reactions.  We think of Hag as an insult, an ugly old woman, an unwanted creature, witch with a wart on the end of her nose.   It’s all around not something you want to be called.    Or is it?  The derivation of Hag goes back and back.   It is one of very few words that have no masculine form, it is a distinctly female term, used all the way back in the thirteenth…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Witches
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: W is for Witching: An Analysis of the Hawthorne Name and Identity by Stephanie M. Wytovich

    W is for Witching: An Analysis of the Hawthorne Name and Identity  By Stephanie M. Wytovich The Salem Witch Trails took place in February of 1692 and lasted until May of 1693. This bout of hysteria began in a small colony in Massachusetts due to the accusations of Elizabeth Paris, Ann Putnam and Abigail Williams, all of who started having fits and unexplainable episodes that evoked suspicion of the supernatural. Eventually, these girls informed two judges—Johnathan Corwin and John Hathorne—that their illnesses were caused by the afflictions of three women: Tituba (a slave), Sarah Osborne (an elderly woman), and Sarah Good (a beggar). Now most of us know the escalation…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Body Horror
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Busting a Gut: Body Horror, Humor, and the Meaning of Life by Amy Vaughn

    Bodies are a horror show.* Slice open our bumpy, hairy surfaces, and bright reds, deep purples, and fatty yellows spill out. Inside, we are weird and squishy and complicated, and oh-so-much more fragile than we wish we were.  We are our bodies. No shit, huh? But give me a second here. There are at least three different ways this statement is true, and each of them will provoke a fear response if threatened.  First, and most straightforwardly, we are our bodies in the corporeal sense: without them we die. Second, we depend on our bodies for our identity, for who we think we are and for how we present ourselves…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Body Horror
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Why Body Horror, or, Why Do We Entertain Ourselves with Grotesque Mutations, Demonic Gestation, Parasitic Infections, and Ghastly Mutilations By Christa Carmen

    The type of horror that can be described as ‘body horror’ is astronomical in scope. A quick google search tells you that horror novels as disparate as Frankenstein and Coraline are considered body horror by one website or another, and when you take a few moments to really think about it, most subcategories within the overarching genre could be loosely classified as body horror. The following is a list of why we—horror fans and regular humans alike, because let’s face it, even alleged horror haters have ogled a gnarly rash on their own, formerly pristine skin or stared in morbid fascination at the growing sphere of their or their partner’s baby bump—love body…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Body Horror
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: This Undeniable Skin: The Grotesque and Lovely Wonders of Body Horror by Gwendolyn Kiste

    This Undeniable Skin: The Grotesque and Lovely Wonders of Body Horror by Gwendolyn Kiste Flesh. Sinew. Bone. Muscle. Nails. Blood. These bodies we occupy are simultaneously beautiful and horrifying. It’s so strange to me how much work is happening within this cage of my bones at every moment. All the heartbeats I never have to coax. All the breaths I never remember taking. It’s at once life-affirming and a little intimidating how much goes on without me ever having a say in it.  This is part of the reason why body horror has long fascinated as well as repulsed me—in the best possible way, of course. From my first viewing…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Creatures
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Be Careful What You Wish For: The Legend of the Wendigo by Renee Miller

    Horror writers have many options when it comes to “scaring” our readers. We can take the real, the surreal, and the totally impossible and (if we’re lucky) use any or all of it to make a reader feel mild discomfort or outright never-turning-the-lights-off-again terror. I think the combination of physical and psychological horror can be pretty effective in keeping a reader off-kilter, which is why I love monsters. They give a “face” to the unknown. The difficulty is in making that face scary. It’s not real, and we all know it, so how do we get the reader to believe in it enough to scare them?  For me, the first…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Creatures
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: Creatures in Horror: From the Weekly World News’ Batboy to Phosphorescent Alien Goop By Betty Rocksteady

    Creatures in Horror: From the Weekly World News’ Batboy to Phosphorescent Alien Goop By Betty Rocksteady My first introduction to horrific creatures was in The Weekly World News, that tabloid magazine from the 80s and 90s featuring weirdo cryptids and Fortean phenomenon. My papa always referred to the mag as just “the news,” so as a kid I was convinced all these creatures were completely real. Actually, I’m still notcompletelyconvinced that those strange beings don’t lurk in hidden corners of the earth. There are a few distinct types of creatures that tend to pop up in genre fiction and I think they all highlight different fears. Secret earthly beings that…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Creatures
    Guest Post

    Guest Post: A Passion for Monsters By Lee Murray

    A Passion for Monsters By Lee Murray From amorphic blob to prehistoric beasts and rampaging apes, and even the humble rat, the creature feature has become a staple of horror fiction. Just a quick look at recent films provides us with a good snapshot: there was last year’s Rampage, this year’s new Godzilla: King of the Monsters, and creature stories based on reality like Crawl, and the 47 Metres Down sequel. Whether on the screen or on the page, our interest in monsters is strongly ingrained. But where did it start? Why so much interest? Into the Mist author Lee Murray asks some of her creature-feature writer friends for their insights.  First up is Australian…