• Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Women in Translation
    Women in Translation

    Women in Translation Horror Edition: Mexico

    August was Women in Translation month, after finding so many amazing women writing horror in other countries we wanted to keep it going. We decided to focus on regions and countries. This month we decided to start with Mexico and Cuba. We have included both works with translated and untranslated works. As much as possibly we have tried to look at the difference in the horror that is being published in country compared to American horror. It was the differences that are really interesting Mexico The horror coming out of Mexico harks back to a very strong oral tradition; where ancient folklore is mixed with religion. What I found interesting…

  • What We've Been Reading
    Book Reviews,  Reading Recommendations

    What We’re Reading #21

    Here’s the newest round-up of our recently read and recommended Ladies of Horror Fiction titles! The End of Days by Jenny Erpenbeck Winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize and the Hans Fallada Prize, The End of Days, by the acclaimed German writer Jenny Erpenbeck, consists essentially of five “books,” each leading to a different death of the same unnamed female protagonist. How could it all have gone differently?—the narrator asks in the intermezzos. The first chapter begins with the death of a baby in the early twentieth-century Hapsburg Empire. In the next chapter, the same girl grows up in Vienna after World War I, but a pact she makes with…

  • Ladies of Horror Fiction celebrates Women in Translation
    Women in Translation

    Women in Translation Month: Horror Edition

    August is Women in Translation month. It is a celebration of stories written by women that have been translated into English. The role of translation in a literary context is to take the story from its original language and translate it into English for publishing in the English speaking countries. That sounds amazing, right? We would be able to read all the amazing stories from around the world. Well, that isn’t necessarily the case. When you really start to look at the numbers, they are dismal. Only 3% of the books published in the United States are translated stories. Whereas, in Europe that number is 10 times higher. Now, before…